Planning


FACTORY ROW RESIDENCE, OLD SALEM MUSEUMS & GARDENS Winston-Salem, North Carolina
BAC/A+P is preparing “The Greening Plan” audit for this authentic Federal-style house on one acre of land originally built in 1831 in the Moravian town of Old Salem. The house has had several alterations over the centuries which have hidden some of the original design features: expanded to a two story house from one and a half stories in the 1850s, with a kitchen added to the rear in the 1880s. The plan suggests improvements to maintenance approaches that include development of a green housekeeping and landscaping plans, improvements of the house’s heating and cooling to be more efficient and environmentally sound by reactivating original design features and design of composting and rain harvesting plans.

DELAWARE DISTRICT RESIDENCE Buffalo, New York
BAC/A+P is preparing “The Greening Plan” audit for this century-old Dutch Colonial Revival house in the historic Delaware District of Buffalo. The greening plan is the third phase of work at the house: phase one included the restoration of the original wood windows and doors and phase two included the replacement of three layers of roofing with a new roof. The audit has identified places to improve energy efficiency by installing insulation in the attic and basement. Further recommendations include a rain harvesting program to water the flower beds and and a composting program to eliminate the use of any fertilizers.

SUNNYSIDE GARDENS RESIDENCE Queens, New York
Sunnyside Gardens, one of the earliest American garden suburbs, was designed in the mid-1920s using English garden city principles. The community, now a National Register-listed historic district, was organized around a number of large common courts and parks which provided shared space for gardening and other group activities. Clarence Stein and Henry Wright served as the architects and planners for this development, and the landscape architect was Marjorie Sewell Cautley. BAC/A+P is using the “The Greening Plan” approach to use the original design aspects of the garden city principles to improve the energy efficiency of this two story brick town home, one of the contributing components of the historic district. A rain harvesting and composting program is being designed to improve the use of resources for the gardens both in front of the house and adjacent to the common court.

COYKENDALL LODGE Hardenburgh, NY
The Coykendall Lodge was one of the few remaining grand hunting and fishing lodges in the Catskills, located on a pristine site overlooking Alder Lake. It was built in 1899 as a summer residence and fishing retreat by Samuel Decker Coykendall, a railroad and canal baron. The building had been vacant for over twenty years when Ms. Campagna led a team which prepared a Feasibility Study for a local preservation organization, the Alder Lake Restoration Society. The existing conditions of the building were evaluated, existing conditions drawings prepared and treatment options prepared. Potential uses for the lodge were identified. Although in poor condition, the building was structurally stable and capable of being reused. Unfortunately, the building was demolished in 2004.

CUSTOM HOUSE Portland, Oregon
Adaptive use and restoration of National Register-listed building designed by James Wetmore in 1930 as the Immigration & Naturalization Services Building for the Northwest. Development of a program to identify a lessee to adapt the building into a hotel under GSA’s guidance. As the GSA Regional Historic Preservation Officer and Preservation Architect, Barbara Campagna developed and managed the design, preservation and regulatory review approaches at the site.

THE DAIRY Central Park, New York, New York
Cyclical Maintenance Plan and Existing Conditions Survey of National Historic Landmark building designed in 1869 by Calvert Vaux. The project included development of a plan to eliminate insect infestation, repair deteriorated wood, clean the exterior masonry and conserve interior decorative finishes. Barbara Campagna was the architect for the project with her firm, Campagna & Russo Architects.

FEDERAL BUILDING Bellingham, Washington
Preparation of compliance package to transfer ownership of former courthouse to the City of Bellingham. Listed in the National Register and designed by renowned federal architect James Knox Taylor in 1911. Design guidelines and easements were developed in conjunction with the National Park Service. As the GSA Regional Historic Preservation Officer and Preservation Architect, Barbara Campagna developed and managed the preservation and regulatory review approaches at the site.

FEDERAL BUILDING Ketchikan, Alaska
Roof restoration and concrete repairs of National Register-listed poured concrete modern-era building designed by Gilbert Stanley Underwood in 1939. Conservation of historic mural in courtroom. As the GSA Regional Historic Preservation Officer and Preservation Architect, Barbara Campagna developed and managed the design, preservation and regulatory review approaches at the site.

INS BUILDING Seattle, Washington
Adaptive use and restoration of National Register-listed building designed by James Wetmore in 1930 as the Immigration & Naturalization Services building for the Northwest. Development of a program to identify a lessee to adapt the building into a mixed-use complex. As the GSA Regional Historic Preservation Officer and Preservation Architect, Barbara Campagna developed and managed the design, preservation and regulatory review approaches at the site.

NAKAMURA COURTHOUSE, Seattle, WA
The United States Courthouse in Seattle, designed by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood, was the first building in the west designed exclusively as a courthouse. The terra cotta clad Art Deco building was completed in 1940 and rehabilitated in 2006 as a LEED Silver project. The changes made to the historic fabric of the site including the insertion of a new entrance, underground parking garage and new walkway and ramps plus the removal of some much-beloved trees required that a complex mitigation program be followed. As the preservation architect for GSA, Barbara worked closely with the consulting design and preservation architects determining and conducting preservation treatments and evaluation. Barbara created and coordinated community and agency review workshops, developed an educational program to document the project and process, and prepared all the Finding of Adverse Impact documents.

BLOOMINGDALE ASYLUM NOW NEW YORK HOSPITAL White Plains, New York
Preparation of a preservation master plan for historic 160-acre psychiatric center hospital campus, the original Bloomingdale Asylum, with 45 buildings, listed as a state historic district. Plan included designation of historic zones and detailed design guidelines. Barbara Campagna developed the master plan while an architect at a New York City preservation firm.

PEACE ARCH BORDER CROSSING Blaine, WA
Barbara managed the Section 106 and design review process for the development of a new border crossing in Blaine, WA while she was the Regional Historic Preservation Officer for GSA. This project was determined to be an adverse impact due to the construction on culturally sensitive Native American lands and the required removal of a neighborhood of existing houses, some determined to be potentially historic. Barbara developed a comprehensive mitigation process which included community and agency review workshops, negotiations with four American tribes and one Canadian tribe, management of an archaeological testing project which included hiring monitors from each of the tribes and preparation of all of the Finding of Adverse Impact documents.

PIONEER COURTHOUSE Portland, Oregon
The restoration and seismic upgrade of the 1879 National Historic Landmark courthouse, located in the heart of downtown Portland, was one of GSA’s most controversial projects in the past 10 years. Barbara was hired as the first professional preservation architect and officer for the Northwest region of GSA specifically to oversee the construction and Section 106 process for this project. The courthouse underwent a comprehensive exterior restoration, interior rehabilitation and seismic upgrade using base isolation. The building, which had functioned as both a courthouse and post office for most of its life, was adapted for use as the Court of Appeals. While not an official LEED project, the team followed all the sound green building construction practices recommended in LEED, including developing a salvage and recycling program for the removed existing fabric. One of the most significant contributions Barbara made was her capacity to build consensus among diverse constituencies. The changes made to the historic fabric including the insertion of a new foundation, and the addition of an underground parking garage and new driveway, required that a complex mitigation program be instituted. She created and coordinated a community review committee, developed a film which documented the entire design and construction process, designed and developed a walking tour and brochure, and developed educational materials for use in the courthouse.

PRESIDENT LINCOLN’S COTTAGE Washington, DC
The rehabilitation of President Lincoln’s Cottage Visitor Education Center, a National Historic Monument, received LEED Gold under Barbara’s direction and included a self-guided Eco-Tour with a podcast by Barbara. As Chief Architect of the National Trust, Barbara managed the completion of the LEED submission for the first project to receive LEED certification at a National Trust Historic Site.

RAIL & TITSWORTH CANAL MUSEUM Belfast, New York
Adaptive Use Feasibility Study and Conditions Survey for restoration and rehabilitation of historic 1855 timber canal warehouse as a canal museum. The canal warehouse is located along the former Genesee Valley Canal, a branch of the Erie Canal. Barbara Campagna prepared the existing conditions survey, worked with the community to determine a feasible reuse and developed design schemes to convert the warehouse into a museum.


RICHARDSON OLMSTED COMPLEX, the former Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane Buffalo, New York

Buffalo’s National Historic Landmark multi-building historic asylum was designed by H. H. Richardson and Olmsted & Vaux on 200 acres from 1871-1895. Barbara was the designer and project manager for the restoration and reuse of Building 10, one of the hospital Ward Buildings, which was adapted for office use and served as a prototype for the restoration of the complex. Changes in hospital management kept the rest of the complex from being restored until the State of New York allocated $70 million in 2006 towards the development of the site and created a new nonprofit to manage the program. Barbara was appointed by the Governor in 2007 as one of five national board members to oversee the site’s development and create an Architecture Center in the famous Richardson towers.

SHEFFIELD FARMS MILK BOTTLING PLANT New York, New York
Historic American Building Survey (HABS) documentation deteriorating 1914 terra cotta milk bottling plant in the Bronx. Level I documentation included measured drawings, large format photographs and a complete history of the site. Barbara Campagna managed the documentation while an architect at a New York City architecture firm.

BEST PRACTICES MANUAL – National Trust Historic Sites
Barbara expanded and updated the National Trust’s Best Practices manual and workbook to provide guidance regarding best practices for the care of structures and landscapes. While this manual includes many policies specific to National Trust Historic Sites, its content and format may also be useful to historic sites and buildings across the country. One very helpful chapter is the Sustainable Practices chapter (Chapter 13, page 80) and includes advice for making your site greener – both through green housekeeping and capital improvements.

SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Barbara is the co-founder and architectural leader of the National Trust’s Sustainability Program which was created in 2006 as the Trust’s approach to climate change. Since buildings are the biggest contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming, the program was developed to focus the nation’s attention on the importance of reusing existing buildings and reinvesting in older and historic communities as critical elements in combating climate change. By recycling existing buildings, we avoid the impacts on the planet that building new buildings causes. Work includes:

ROYCROFT CAMPUS East Aurora, New York
Feasibility Study for the reuse of the National Historic Landmark Roycroft Inn and master plan for the Roycroft Campus (a turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts complex created by Elbert Hubbard). Barbara Campagna prepared the plans while an architect at a Buffalo A/E firm.

RYE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Rye, New York
Existing Conditions Survey of National Register-listed church complex designed by Richard M. Upjohn in 1870. Barbara led this project for Campagna & Easton Architects.

Changing the Face of LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design)
Barbara is the primary contact between the preservation community and the U.S. Green Building Council and has been advising USGBC staff on all of the changes to LEED since 2007. As a guest expert reviewer, her responsibilities include recommending new cultural and preservation metrics and credits, reviewing the changes to LEED 2009 and 2012, evaluating and responding to project questions related to the new existing building pilot credits, and developing workshops and training for both preservation and green building professionals. Barbara is continuing to manage this work for the National Trust as a consultant.

Sustainable Stewardship Practices
Under Barbara’s direction, the National Trust initiated and implemented many levels of sustainable practices from green housekeeping to capital improvements at its 29 historic sites. All capital projects now include eco-charrettes and determination of LEED registration as a green tool. The rehabilitation of President Lincoln’s Cottage Visitor Education Center received LEED Gold under Barbara’s direction and included a self-guided Eco-Tour with a podcast.

MASTER PLANS
Ms. Campagna has completed Master Plans for a variety of historic sites and complexes. One example is Mercy College, headquartered in Dobbs Ferry, NY. Mercy College headquarters are located on 100 spectacular acres overlooking the Hudson. The buildings range from Colonial Revival houses to 1959 International Style classroom buildings. The Master Plan analyzed the existing conditions, programmatic needs and growth opportunities for the College, resulting in a 10 year capital plan with a budget over $100 million.

DISASTER PLANS
Barbara Campagna worked with the 29 historic sites of the National Trust from 2006-2011 to develop and implement usable disaster and emergency plans. None of our historic sites is immune from disaster; in the past ten years our country has encountered devastating loss from flooding, hurricanes and fires. Add climate change to the mix and we have found that our disaster recovery efforts are taking up more and more of our funds for our buildings. Like Cyclical Maintenance Plans, there are different levels and costs of disaster planning and one isn’t better than the other.

CYCLICAL MAINTENANCE PLANS
Barbara Campagna has developed cyclical maintenance plans for many historic buildings and sites including the Belvedere Castle and Dairy in Central Park, the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois and the Frank Lloyd Wright Pope-Leighey house in Alexandria, Virginia.

The goal of preservation is to manage the inevitable deterioration of a building. In order to fulfill this goal, necessary measures must be taken to sustain the existing form, integrity, and materials of a historic property. Preservation aims to minimize replacement, and to emphasize protection, maintenance, and repair. In many respects, Cyclical  Maintenance Manuals are the most important document a site can ever develop. Cyclical Maintenance Programs &  Manuals are useful tools for owners because they specify proper maintenance measures to reduce wear and  deterioration, and to prolong the life of the building and site. The goal of these manuals is to provide a means for the  staff to prevent deterioration, treat problems, and document conditions and activity. Proper maintenance will mitigate minor problems before they advance and require major intervention. A typical maintenance manual provides a  comprehensive preservation maintenance plan, covering the full range of maintenance activities from routine  preventative tasks and condition surveys to hands-on treatment recommendations and documentation.

HISTORIC SURVEYS
Barbara Campagna is an expert in researching and writing complex National Register nominations as shown by the range of nominations she has had approved – from the Jackson Heights Historic District in Queens, one of the largest historic districts in the country to the Richard H. Mandel House, the first International Style building in New York State to be listed in the National Register. 

HISTORIC ASYLUMS
Barbara has developed an expertise in the restoration and reuse of historic asylums, stemming from her graduate thesis at Columbia University’s Historic Preservation Program, in which she developed an adaptive use plan for the deteriorating Buffalo Psychiatric Center, a National Historic Landmark Kirkbride Plan asylum.

Her efforts have been grass roots as well as professional. As the Executive Director of the Landmark Society of the Niagara Frontier in the late 1980s, she developed a program with the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Architecture to reuse the Buffalo Psychiatric Center that included a lecture series, conference and edited book of essays.

Buffalo’s multiple-building complex was designed by H. H.Richardson, and Olmsted & Vaux as the Buffalo State Asylum on 200 acres, built from 1872-1892. Barbara was the designer and project manager for the restoration and reuse of Building 10, one of the hospital Ward Buildings, which was adapted for office use and served as a prototype for the restoration of the complex. Changes in hospital management kept the rest of the complex from being restored until the State of New York allocated $70 million in 2006 towards the development of the site and created a new nonprofit to manage the program. Barbara was appointed by the Governor in 2007 as one of five national board members to oversee the site’s development and create an Architecture Center in the famous Richardson towers.

Other historic asylum projects include preparation of a Preservation Management Plan for the Bloomingdale Asylum in White Plains, New York, now the New York Presbyterian Hospital; the preservation specialist for an Urban Land Institute Panel to determine a reuse for St. Elizabeths Asylum in Washington, DC and the stabilization of the historic asylum complex on Ellis Island.

 

© Copyright Barbara Campagna – True Green Cities - 2011-2013