True Green Cities / Why Green Museum Standards Don’t Really Exist

The greening of the Haas-Lilienthal House, a house museum in San Francisco, was one of the case studies presented at the AAM Summit on Sustainability Standards.

The greening of the Haas-Lilienthal House, a house museum in San Francisco, was one of the case studies presented at the AAM Summit on Sustainability Standards. Photo courtesy San Francisco Architectural Heritage.

Last month I was a speaker at the AAM Summit on Sustainability Standards held during AAM's annual conference in Baltimore.  Below is a summary of the key topics that were discussed. How do you develop green rating systems for a building type so broad that it includes art museums, history museums, historic sites, arboretums, aquariums, and zoos? PIC-Green, a professional interest committee of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) started asking just that question last month in Baltimore at AAM's annual convention. One of the major goals of AAM's mission is to develop standards and best-practices for the field. To read the rest of this story, please go to UBM's Future Cities. And if you’d like to “subscribe” or follow my blog, True Green Cities, please sign up through the “Subscribe” button at the bottom left of this page. You’ll receive a daily recap when new blogs are posted. Or Sign up for the Feed.    
© Copyright Barbara Campagna – True Green Cities - 2011-2013